“If you’re feeling small today I dare you to sit up straighter, look someone who scares you directly in the eye, take up room at the dinner table, make yourself bigger, when ‘sorry’ laps at the back of your tongue, tries to pick up after you, remind yourself that your existence doesn’t demand an apology, that you are allowed to make mess and take up space, do not be afraid to expand. Every single goddamn minute. Expand, expand, expand”

Femme Fatale (x)

*Sit Up A Little Straighter*

(via aishaamplified)

YES

(via opheliasrevenge)

(via opheliasrevenge)

“The art of storytelling is coming to an end. Less and less frequently do we encounter people with the ability to tell a tale properly. More and more often there is embarrassment all around when the wish to hear a story is expressed. It is as if something that seemed inalienable to us, the securest among our possessions, were taken from us: the ability to exchange experiences.”
— Walter Benjamin, The Storyteller. (via bustakay)

(via notational)

ladybrun:

FINALLY: Israel accused of its warcrimes by members of parliament in the UK

"We should not equate the occupied with the occupier, we should not equate a refugee population of 1.7mil imprisoned in a tiny strip of land, with prison guards, we should not equate terrorists firing rockets with a supposedly "civilized" state systematically killing women, children, disabled and elderly people…If UK and other Western governments fail to discriminate between the actions of Hamas and israel, hundreds of Palestinian civilians will continue to die and the annexation of Palestine by israel will continue.”

(via amillionparachutes)

“Human civilization is founded on a social contract, but all too often that gets reduced to a kind of charity: Help those who are less fortunate, think of those who are different. But there’s a subtler form of contract, which is the connection between us all.”

Questlove, 

"When the People Cheer: How Hip-Hop Failed Black America"

"But the moment when everything can be defined in terms of the territorially bounded Jamaica is finished — globalisation has finished it. The fate here is being decided elsewhere; it’s being decided in Washington, and it’s going to be decided in Baghdad,
decided in the World Trade Organisation, etc.
What’s more, migration, which is the underside of globalisation, is happening everywhere — people are landing up displaced by poverty, under-development, civil war, ethnic cleansing, ecological devastation, environmental disaster, HIV — you know, millions of people are on the move inside Africa itself. Millions
of people are living in transit camps, not to speak of the millions of Palestinians, millions of people on the borders between India and Pakistan that are displaced. The world is defined by displaced people, migration, and domination of global
capital. So the idea of the nation state, which is going to winnow out this little window for its people, and the world’s going to leave it alone to prosper in its little backyard, is finished.”


-Stuart Hall, “Culture is Always a Translation”

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More
wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More
wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More
wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More
wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More
wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More
wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings
The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.
Read More

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings

The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.

Read More

(via npr)

I hate love this
yagazieemezi:

Meet Your Photographer, a short series that will be introducing you to the contributing photographers of yagazieemezi.com over the next couple of weeks. You will be seeing their work on here fairly often so this is an excellent way for you to get familiar with these talented folks. 
My name is Tj Letsa and I’m a 25 year old photographer from Accra, Ghana. I picked up photography from a friend who showed me the basics of the art and I really enjoyed it. At first, I wanted to start a menswear blog, figuring that my sense of style would be an advantage. This was during the time when the menswear blog craze had hit the internet and I like many, wanted to bring this wave into Accra, Ghana.
"I have always had a creative side. Picking up a camera just helped me to express it more. I’m on a journey with my creative self to portray my heart. I believe in the art of photography and not the science of it.  Photography should be a tool for which people would use to document the most memorable periods and stories and relive it by looking at each photo. African Brands should also use photography as a powerful reminder of their corporate entity and tell their own stories."
Read more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Meet Your Photographer, a short series that will be introducing you to the contributing photographers of yagazieemezi.com over the next couple of weeks. You will be seeing their work on here fairly often so this is an excellent way for you to get familiar with these talented folks. 
My name is Tj Letsa and I’m a 25 year old photographer from Accra, Ghana. I picked up photography from a friend who showed me the basics of the art and I really enjoyed it. At first, I wanted to start a menswear blog, figuring that my sense of style would be an advantage. This was during the time when the menswear blog craze had hit the internet and I like many, wanted to bring this wave into Accra, Ghana.
"I have always had a creative side. Picking up a camera just helped me to express it more. I’m on a journey with my creative self to portray my heart. I believe in the art of photography and not the science of it.  Photography should be a tool for which people would use to document the most memorable periods and stories and relive it by looking at each photo. African Brands should also use photography as a powerful reminder of their corporate entity and tell their own stories."
Read more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Meet Your Photographer, a short series that will be introducing you to the contributing photographers of yagazieemezi.com over the next couple of weeks. You will be seeing their work on here fairly often so this is an excellent way for you to get familiar with these talented folks. 
My name is Tj Letsa and I’m a 25 year old photographer from Accra, Ghana. I picked up photography from a friend who showed me the basics of the art and I really enjoyed it. At first, I wanted to start a menswear blog, figuring that my sense of style would be an advantage. This was during the time when the menswear blog craze had hit the internet and I like many, wanted to bring this wave into Accra, Ghana.
"I have always had a creative side. Picking up a camera just helped me to express it more. I’m on a journey with my creative self to portray my heart. I believe in the art of photography and not the science of it.  Photography should be a tool for which people would use to document the most memorable periods and stories and relive it by looking at each photo. African Brands should also use photography as a powerful reminder of their corporate entity and tell their own stories."
Read more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

Meet Your Photographer, a short series that will be introducing you to the contributing photographers of yagazieemezi.com over the next couple of weeks. You will be seeing their work on here fairly often so this is an excellent way for you to get familiar with these talented folks. 

My name is Tj Letsa and I’m a 25 year old photographer from Accra, Ghana. I picked up photography from a friend who showed me the basics of the art and I really enjoyed it. At first, I wanted to start a menswear blog, figuring that my sense of style would be an advantage. This was during the time when the menswear blog craze had hit the internet and I like many, wanted to bring this wave into Accra, Ghana.

"I have always had a creative side. Picking up a camera just helped me to express it more. I’m on a journey with my creative self to portray my heart. I believe in the art of photography and not the science of it.  Photography should be a tool for which people would use to document the most memorable periods and stories and relive it by looking at each photo. African Brands should also use photography as a powerful reminder of their corporate entity and tell their own stories."

Read more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

“Honey, who said that the love of your life had to be a man or woman you haven’t even met yet? Maybe, you are destined to be the greatest love of your own life.”
Della Hicks-Wilson (via dreamguide)

(via imalluncharted)

indigorenaissancewoman:

jnte:

I have loads of it! 

Sun kissed 8 times image

(via autumnimani)

mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.

mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.